Haiku: Lonely Bones

Walking through a pasture yesterday, I spied something white in the long grass and discovered that it was a partial skull (the mandible is missing, and it’s flipped upside down). The deer to whom the skull belongs has clearly been dead for a while, and given the austere time of year, its remains could have been scavenged by some hungry animal and the skull left where the meal ended.

Small herds of deer visit our property, grazing and resting, from time to time. Maybe this was one of those visiting deer or its offspring.

I can’t help but wonder how it came to rest here…dragged by a coyote, perhaps? It’s stark reminder of the fleeting and fragile nature of life, especially for creatures that are wild and free.

Musings: Writing As Sustenance

It’s a special time of day: I’m sitting in the breakfast “nook” in my kitchen in early morning, sipping chai tea, listening to Yaz (and wondering if the song “Only You ” reminds me more of The [British] Office or Fringe) and letting the creative juices flow. I luxuriate in the quiet and solitude, knowing that – right now – the Oxford comma rules supreme here. After years of trying different professional roles, I’ve finally come to the point where I realize that I am, first and foremost, a writer…and everything else will be inextricably interwoven with that identity.

Continue reading “Musings: Writing As Sustenance”

Haiku: Tidal Pull

Watching the motion of waves has always been meditative for me, soothing and comforting. Is it because I’m a water sign? Perhaps…or perhaps it’s some faint memory of being in utero. Regardless, I could sit and stare at the water all day, thinking deep thoughts and wondering about the life in that environment, a world inhospitable to me but perfectly suited to them. Are there really two worlds, one on land and one in the sea?

Thinking about ocean life means thinking about how humans have impacted the denizens of the waterworld, like the fact that there are estimated to only be around 400 North Atlantic right whales alive now. Having been hunted to the brink of extinction in the beginning of the 20th century, banning the hunting of this species allowed their numbers to very slowly recover…until this last decade, which saw unusually high mortality, attributed primarily to human causes (ship strikes and entanglement in fishing gear).

On this trajectory, one day, there may be no more North Atlantic right whales. And the planet will be poorer for it.

Read more about the plight of the North Atlantic right whales here.

Musings: Keeping It Real In Farming

Reality check: snow happens (photo from yesterday)

There seems to have been a run of misfortune on the farm recently, with a newly-hatched duckling and chick, as well as a young adult goose, dying in the past few weeks. This isn’t “usual” around here, but deaths are part of farm life. And I think it’s important to show that side of animal husbandry, too.

Continue reading “Musings: Keeping It Real In Farming”

Haiku: When Hope Isn’t Enough

One of the six remaining geese from April’s hatch died today – photo above from happier times. She was the last gosling to hatch, needing a little assistance. From the beginning, she had what I can only describe as a “dreamy” look to her, as if she were always thinking of a far-off place. She grew normally and, until now, she’d been healthy and active like the others.

Continue reading “Haiku: When Hope Isn’t Enough”