Farm Ferments: Hands-On Kimchi

I’m just guessing that there may be some people out there for whom having hands redolent of garlic, fish sauce, and gochugaru (고추가루) would be unappealing…but I actually find it rather pleasant. Why? Because I know it means some delectable variety of kimchi is underway. In a couple of weeks, the nascent kimchi – currently salty and crisp – will be perfectly fermented and full of probiotic goodness.

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Farm Ferments: Friendship Kkakdugi (깍두기)

It was a cold and rainy day…the kind of day meant for indoors pursuits. I had purchased a big, fresh Korean radish (Mu 무) recently, along with scallions, and the time felt right to create something tasty from these ingredients. Having recently met someone who mentioned that she enjoyed kimchi but didn’t make it herself, I decided that some of this batch of Kkakdugi (깍두기) would be gifted.

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Farm Ferments: Just A Small Jar Of Kkakdugi (깍두기 , Korean Radish Kimchi)

The wax paper is intended to keep the fragrance from permanently permeating the lid

I typically make two quart jars of my favorite kimchi, kkakdugi, at a time. The last time I did, though, the second jar became a bit too fermented (it gets very soft and loses that radish crunchiness I like) for my taste. With a lonely, soon-to-be-rubbery daikon in the crisper drawer, it simply made sense to make a small batch of this spicy probiotic condiment.

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Dinner For Breakfast: Loco Moco

I made that kkakdugi!

I have eaten my fair share of “local food”, meaning the multicultural food culture the diverse people of Hawaii have created and made uniquely their own, and includes influences from ethnic Hawaiian, Korean, Chinese, Japanese, Portugese, and Filipino food. When you eat “local food”, you’re eating from a cultural melting pot that has successfully married unlikely partners such as Spam and the sticky rice and nori from sushi. Don’t call it Spam sushi – it’s Spam musubi (pronounced “moo-soo-bee”, accent on the first syllable). It used to be a guilty pleasure, but I no longer eat it because it (1) contains factory farmed pork , (2) contains sodium nitrite, and (3) is high in sodium.  Continue reading “Dinner For Breakfast: Loco Moco”